The Forest of Dean.

Bygone Days





































Bygone Days



Meadow Clifff Colliery.

Henry Roberts took on Roberts Folly gale in 1843 but after 5 years he surrendered the gale as there did not seem to be much coal left in the coal seam. There were several changes in ownership but none of the attempts to make the gale financially viable were successful.

Apart from the often frequent changes in ownership, which seemed on average to be about every three years or so, over the years there was a continuing thread of management crises, such as:

   - held gale for two years until rent due then surrendered it ...
   - threatened forfeiture for non working ...
   - meeting of unsecured creditors called ...
   - directors expect company to earn £600 p.a. & they have advanced almost £5,000 so far ...
   - seriously hit by the strike ...
   - whole of company's output factored ...
   - to sell moveable plant & buildings ...
   - seized by H.M. Taxes ...
   - sell remaining plant ...
   - sued at Littledean Police Court by about 20 workmen for wages due ...
   - colliery closed due to lack of funds ...
   - siding laid without a license ...
   - not all of plant sold ...
   - money still owed to the Crown ...
   - gale to be forfeited ...
   - remaining plant sold for £30 ...
   - new slope made without permission ...

In 1916 a consortium of financial backers formed the Meadow Cliff Colliery Co. Ltd. which took over what was now the New Roberts Folly gale and created the Meadow Cliff Colliery.

The major seams worked were the Crow Delf and the Twenty Inch Seam which, as its' name suggests was only 20 inches thick ... in fact both these seams were a mere 1 foot 6 inches of workable coal which, along with continuing financial & management problems, some of which are listed above, limited the output to a temporary peak of 120 tons per week.

Despite investments, such as the siding at the new Meadow Cliff Colliery being connected to the Churchway Branch of the Great Western Railway's Forest of Dean Branch, a continual history of financial problems prevented the colliery from making a continuous. The plant was finally sold off in 1924 and the company itself wound up three years later in 1927.

Ernest Tremain tried to make a go of the Colliery from 1928 until 1936 but was not successful in his attempts to make a profit. Today the site of the original gale which now only contains a spoil tip and a filled-in shaft has become a heavily overgrown area in a Forestry Commission coniferous plantation.

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